Details from Elizabeth Taylor's Funeral

Details from Elizabeth Taylor's Funeral

We're learning new details about Elizabeth Taylor's funeral from the rabbi who was there.

Rabbi Jerry Cutler officiated because Taylor converted to Judaism when she married Mike Todd.

"They handled it beautifully and it was respectable, as befitting Elizabeth Taylor. It was done with a great amount of thought and planning and it was subdued and beautiful," said Rabbi Cutler.

The funeral was scheduled to start at Forest Lawn cemetery at 2 pm Thursday, but with touch of whimsy, Taylor actually left instructions that she wanted the service to start 15 minutes late. She wanted her funeral to reflect the way she'd lived her life—always the star, and always fashionably late.

"She even wanted to be late for her own funeral," her publicist said in a statement.

Five black stretch limousines carried Taylor's family, her four children and ten grandchildren, through the gates of Forest Lawn and to the great mausoleum where a huge white tent sheltered the entrance.

The great mausoleum is filled inside with marble and statues everywhere.

Taylor was buried in a crypt, sheltered under a soaring marble Michelangelo angel.

Taylor's crypt is close to her great friend, Michael Jackson. Legendary movie icons Clark Gable and Jean Harlow are also buried nearby.

Taylor's casket is a traditional Jewish casket made entirely out of dark mahogany and in keeping with Jewish tradition, there are no nails. The casket reportedly costs $11,000.

"It was full of flowers, covering the casket," said Rabbi Cutler.

The funeral service lasted approximately one hour. Actor Colin Farrell read a poem, that says in part: "Give beauty back, beauty, beauty, beauty, back to God."

Joey Bartolomeo of People magazine told INSIDE EDITION, "One of Elizabeth's grandsons performed a trumpet solo of 'Amazing Grace,' during the ceremony."

INSIDE EDITION spotted supermodel Kathy Ireland leaving Forest Lawn.

Morgan Fairchild spoke to INSIDE EDITION about her close friend, Elizabeth Taylor.

"I think she had a great sense of humor. The one thing that time didn't seem to diminish was that sense of fun and mischief that she certainly always had," said Fairchild.