Miss USA Contestants Making the News

Miss USA Contestants Making the News

The new Miss USA isn't the only contestant stirring up controversy. It turns out runner-up Miss Oklahoma was far ahead until she gave an answer about Arizona's controversial immigration law.

"I'm a huge believer in state's rights. I think that's what's so wonderful about America. So I think it's perfectly fine for Arizona to create that law and I am against illegal immigration but I am also against racial profiling, so I see both sides in this issue."

The judge who asked that question is actor Oscar Nunez and some are comparing the moment to when Perez Hilton torpedoed Miss California Carrie Prejean's chances of winning when she gave her now-famous answer to a question about gay marriage in 2009.

"I believe that a marriage should be between a man and a woman, no offense to anybody out there," said Prejean.

Miss Oklahoma, Morgan Elizabeth Woolard, says she has "no regrets" about her answer. "I do believe that it was a polarizing question. And if you ask a polarizing question, you're probably going to get a polarizing answer," she told Fox News.

Meanwhile, the whole country is talking about the racy photos of the winner, Miss Michigan, Rima Fakih, competing in a pole dancing competition in 2007.

The Muslim community's reaction to Fakih's win is mixed. There is pride over her visible role as Miss USA, and disappointment that she had to show so much skin to win the title.

One young Muslim blogger wrote, "It's cool. She's an Arab. She's representing us. But in order to be Miss USA, you have to wear a bikini. That's not allowed in our religion. It's okay to look beautiful, but at the same time, you're supposed to cover up your beauty."

Tonight Show host Jay Leno was quick to poke fun at the controversy: "In America we don't care about your politics; if you look smoking hot in a bikini, we will embrace you!"

Fakih is not the first Arab-American to win the title. Julie Hayek, who was Miss USA in 1983 was. Her father was born in Lebanon.