Inside The American Music Awards

Inside The American Music Awards

The top stars of pop all tried to out do each other at last night's American Music Awards.

Miley sang her hit song "Wrecking Ball" with a giant digital cat lip-synching the words behind her.  She wore high-cut briefs and a matching crop-top covered in pictures of cat heads. At one point, the cat shed diamond tears.

The singer turned 21 on Saturday, and she celebrated turning the legal drinking age with a bottle of champagne with good friend, Kelly Osbourne.

Watch INSIDE EDITION On The AMA Red Carpet

Lady Gaga did a sexy duet with R. Kelly, as the AMA stage was turned into the Oval Office of the White House.

Earlier in the night, Gaga made her grand entrance riding a white horse onto the red carpet.  She was channeling another lady, Lady Godiva.

And, Katy Perry opened the show with a Geisha-inspired performance that some found a bit offensive.

But a Katy supporter hit back tweeting: "It honestly bothers me that people believe @katyperry performance was a racist act. She loves the Japanese culture and Japan loves her."

Rihanna performed her hit song diamonds before being presented with the first ever icon award by her proud mother, Monica Fenty.

Justin Timberlake accepted his award for Favorite Male Artist right after Rihanna, and imitated her mom's charming Caribbean accent.

Timberlake attended the AMAs all by himself, prompting the Twitterverse to erupt with questions about the whereabouts of his wife, Jessica Biel.

One fan tweeted: "Is it just me or are Jessica Biel and Justin Timberlake never out together anymore?"

Jessica quickly hit back, "I'm watching from home tonight. Calm down, internet."

Meantime, Christina Aguilera hit the red carpet showing off her dramatic weight loss in a white-hot, curve-clinging gown.

Our cameras caught One Direction fans nearly knocking down the gates at the Nokia Theater in Los Angeles as the boy band arrived. Security guards had to push back the barricade.

But, all eyes were on the leading ladies of pop and their "who-can-top this" performances.