Woman Who Gave Birth on Plane Allegedly Gets Deported from U.S. Without Baby

The woman who went into labor on a U.S.-bound flight has reportedly been deported back to Taiwan without her baby after it was discovered that she allegedly lied about how far along in her pregnancy she was.

The mother, known by her last name Jian, gave birth at 30,000 feet above the Pacific Ocean, six hours into a 19-hour flight from Taiwan to Los Angeles.

Staff aboard the China Airlines plane helped deliver the baby and a video that captured the moment has since gone viral.

"We didn’t really know that the woman was giving birth," passenger Amira Rajput told INSIDE EDITION at the time.

"[It] wasn’t like ooh! We need a doctor," she said. "She wasn’t even screaming or anything."

Now it has been claimed that the expecting mother refused to lie down to give birth and repeatedly asked "Are we in U.S. Airspace yet?"

"Don't give this woman... any sympathy!!!!" wrote Flight attendant Lucienne Chen, who helped deliver the baby.

Read: Passenger Gives Birth to Premature Baby at 30,000 Feet With Help of Airline Crew

Chen claimed the woman never told staff that she was expecting, saying when she boarded the flight that she had gas, and then said she was 32 weeks pregnant when she went into labor.

Expectant mothers are allowed to fly without requiring permission from a doctor up to that point in a pregnancy, but Chen alleged that the woman was four weeks further along.

"And who will just ask a lady 'excuse me, are you pregnant?'" Chen wrote on her Facebook.

The Taiwanese woman was in labor for about two hours, as flight attendants stood watch and a doctor conducted the delivery, Rajput told INSIDE EDITION.

The flight made an emergency landing in Anchorage, Alaska so the new mother could be taken to a hospital. The plane then proceeded to Los Angeles three hours behind schedule.

Since infants are not allowed to fly before they are at least 14 days old, the baby was under the care of state authorities in Alaska, Chen wrote.

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A family friend then assumed custody of the baby, the Daily Mail reported.

It was not immediately clear if and when the mother and child would be reunited.

Taiwan's Transportation Minister Chen Jian-yu told Shanghaiist.com that the mother will likely be liable for the costs of diverting the flight.

Chen made the announcement during a session at the Legislative Yuan saying: "Compensation (to China Airlines) will likely be inevitable."

The airline said Jian's insurance company is calculating the cost of such a birth, Shanghaiist reported.

"Not only did you take the lives of both yourself and your child as a joke, you also took the schedules of a plane full of people as a joke - all because of your child's American passport!" Chen wrote. "An entire plane had to be diverted, causing scheduling problems for all the other innocent passengers."

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