Australian Fake Collar Bomb Victim Breaks Her Silence

Australian Fake Collar Bomb Victim Breaks Her Silence

The beautiful heiress who spent ten terrifying hours believing a bomb was chained to her neck speaks out for the first time.

"I'm glad it's all over," said Madeleine Pulver.

Chilling new details are emerging about international businessman Paul Douglas Peters, the man accused of chaining what turned out to be a fake bomb around Madeleine's neck at her luxurious home in Sydney, Australia.

Authorities say in court papers say Peters broke into the house wearing a mask and carrying a baseball bat and a backpack, and told the terrified 18-year-old, "Sit down and no one needs to get hurt."

Peters then allegedly chained a black box around her neck and attached an extortion note to it, which said the box contained "powerful new technology plastic explosives"

The note also issued this warning: "The case is booby-trapped."

Madeleine contacted her parents and told them to call the police, then saw that the note warned her not to contact the authorities! But the bomb turned out to be a fake, and nobody was hurt.

Meanwhile, bizarre details are emerging about the suspect, who was traced to the Louisville home of Debra Lee Peters, his ex-wife and the mother of their three children.

"Peters just came back to that address because he considered it a safe haven," says WHAS11 Louisville reporter Adam Walser.

Peters reportedly once worked for a company with links to Madeleine's dad, William Pulver, the CEO of an information technology company and one of the richest men in Australia.

And listen to what Peters said when he was taken away by authorities!

A reporter asked if he had any word for Madeleine, and Peters replied, "I hope she's well."

Perhaps the young woman at the center of the strange story put it best: "It's all very surreal."