Woman Says Facebook Friend Broke Into Her Home

Woman Says Facebook Friend Broke Into Her Home

Brazen burglars were caught on tape ransacking a house. So how did they know nobody was home?

Believe it or not, the homeowner says one of them is her Facebook friend!

"It blows my mind that people are out there that would take advantage of being your 'friend,' " says Keri McMullen.

McMullen and her fiancé Kurt have almost 600 Facebook friends. They were headed to a Saturday night concert and posted this Facebook message: "Heading...to see Fire Department."
A half hour after they left, two robbers wearing gloves jimmied open the back door with a screwdriver.

"They were here for 13 minutes; they used the laundry basket downstairs, they emptied out laundry to fill it with the electronics," McMullen says.

Surveillance cameras caught the robbers scooping up $10,000 worth of stuff, including laptops, DVRs, and a plasma television.

They carried the loot outside and video shows them speeding away in the getaway car.

McMullen posted the surveillance video on her Facebook page, and that's when she realized one of the robbers was a dead ringer for her Facebook friend, a guy she says she knew in high school and hadn't seen for 20 years.

Cops are now searching for him, and McMullen says she's learned a valuable lesson about Facebook: "I will be going through my friends list and deleting everyone on there I don't keep in contact with on a regular basis," she says.

With an estimated 400 million people worldwide now using Facebook, INSIDE EDITION asked internet security expert John Lucich of e-forensix.com what you can do to protect yourself from unfriendly Facebook friends.

"Don't place personal information on there, don’t tell them about a new stereo system you got, don’t tell them about cash. It's about time people stopped doing the stupid stuff that causes the victimization of themselves," Lucich advises.

"I've learned not to put where I'm going or what I'm doing on Facebook," says McMullen.