Neighborhood Watch Shooter's Past Comes Into Question

Neighborhood Watch Shooter's Past Comes Into Question

Thousands of people vented their fury over the shooting of an unarmed teenager by a neighborhood watch volunteer.

Protestors wore hoodies to identify with shooting victim Trayvon Martin, as they gathered in Manhattan's Union Square for what is being called "The Million Hoodie March." On Thursday, hundreds of high school students walked out of a Miami school in protest of Martin's killing.

New information is emerging about the shooter, neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman.  

Zimmerman was involved in a domestic violence dispute in 2005, which resulted in him getting scratches on his face.

"It became a pushing match. My dog jumped up and bit him on the cheek," his former fiancé claimed in court documents.

In another incident, she claimed Zimmerman groped her and  "Picked me up and threw me on the bed."

Zimmerman denied her claims and said the scratches came when she attacked him. A judge ordered them to stay away from each other.

While Zimmerman has been the subject of scorn and anger across America, there are some people who are coming to his defense.

Frank Taaffe, a former colleague on the Neighborhood Watch Patrol in Sanford, Florida, told INSIDE EDITION, "I firmly believe that it was self defense. You have to ask the questions, 'How did George get a wound on the back of his head? Why were their grass stains on his pants? How did he get punched in the nose?' Were those self inflicted? I don't think so."

Sanford City commissioners passed a vote of no confidence in the city's police Chief Bill Lee by 3 to 2 after a stormy meeting.

Now City Manager Norton Bonaparte has to decide whether to fire the police chief. He says he wants to conduct an independent investigation.

"If they did something they shouldn't have done, I want to know that. If they didn't do something they should have done I want to know that," said Bonaparte.