Will George Zimmerman Get a Fair Trial?

Will George Zimmerman Get a Fair Trial?

Can George Zimmerman ever get a fair trial? That's the question being asked across the country today.

INSIDE EDITION consulted with Judge Larry Seidlin, who presided over another high-profile case: the fight over Anna Nicole Smith's body.

INSIDE EDITION's Les Trent asked, "In this atmosphere, will it be possible for George Zimmerman to get a fair trial?"

"Will it be perfect justice? No, because the jury pool is going to be polluted," Seidlin said.

The killing of Trayvon Martin has gripped America for a month. Now, many are saying that it may be difficult to find an impartial jury.

Trent asked Seidlin, "If you were presiding over this case, how would you go about making sure that this jury was not tainted?"

"I would try to inquire with each juror, their background, their prejudices, their biases, and then of course, how much they know about the case. You're going to have to do a lot of plowing, you're going to have to dig real deep to get a good, impartial juror," Seidlin answered.

Judge Seidlin doesn't think moving the trial out of Seminole County, Florida would help matters.

"If you move it to Idaho, Indiana, people have read about this case. People have viewed this case," Seidlin said.

Paul Boyd spoke with Florida jury consultant Susan Constantine outside the courthouse where Zimmerman appeared before a judge today.

"What type of pressure will a juror be under if they sit on this case?" Boyd asked.

"Intense. That's the word that I would put with it because quite frankly, the weight of the world is going to be sitting on their shoulders," Constantine said.

Some people believe the country hasn't been this racially divided since the O.J. Simpson trial. INSIDE EDITION spoke with David Aldana, who served on the jury.  

"George Zimmerman, yes I think he can get a fair trial. You'll be able to find honest people, no matter what city you're in. You'll find some honest people somewhere who can do the job," said Aldana.

Judge Seidlin said that even with the public anger directed at Zimmerman, the case is going to be challenging to prove.

"They're going to have a tough time convincing this jury that he's guilty, because the only other person that can contest what the defendant will say is dead," Seidlin said.