Woman Faces Harsh Reality From Butt Injections

Woman Faces Harsh Reality From Butt Injections

You are not seeing things. This woman's butt is so big, people stare wherever she goes.

30-year-old Kenyatta Lynn Johnson wasn't born with this butt. She quite literally had it made. It's the result of massive amounts of silicone injected into her backside.

INSIDE EDITION's Megan Alexander asked Johnson, "What kind of comments to you hear?"

"Oh, I hear it all. 'You look stupid. That's fake,' " said Johnson.

Alexander asked, "How many shots total have you gotten?"

"They're in the thousands," replied Johnson.

Five years ago, she was an athletically built young woman. But her desire for a voluptuous bottom led her to a Detroit hotel where she paid $500 for her first black market injections.

"Were you nervous?" asked Alexander.

"I was more scared than nervous," replied Johnson.

She showed us how the silicone was administered.

"There were approximately 60 shots on the bottom and 60 shots on the top, for a total of 120 shots, per side," Johnson explained. "It turned into a pure addiction."

Alexander asked, "You are addicted?"

"I was. I know. I don't think. I don't believe someone can go do as much as I did, and go as far as I did, and not be addicted," said Johnson.

At first, she was actually happy with the results. Her butt is a size 45. She's even written a book about her experiences, Shot Girls under the name Vanity Wonder.

But now the problems have started.

Detailing some of the side effects, Johnson said, "It hurt so much to sit on it. I would have to shift. So I would shift on one cheek, let it sit until that one got numb, and then I would shift to the next one. Sometimes my legs would go numb."

An infection also set in.

"It became very lumpy. After that, I had to have injection after injection after injection to cover how lumpy it was," she said.

Miami cosmetic surgeon Constantine Mendieta says black market butt injections are a dangerous epidemic.

"What patients are doing without knowing it, they're rolling the dice. They are actually playing Russian roulette with their own health," said Mendieta. "The most common question I'll ask these patients is, 'what was injected?' The most common answer is always, 'I don't know.' "

Johnson said, "I often worry that a piece of it might break away go to my heart and I'll have a heart attack."

For now at least, she is sticking with this unique look, and all looks that come her way on the street.

"Whatever happens, I'll deal with it. I do like what I see in the mirror, but that's because I've accepted it," said Johnson.