Mitt Romney Say's 47% Of Americans Depend on Government Handouts

Mitt Romney Say's 47% Of Americans Depend on Government Handouts

The man behind the leak of that embarrassing video of Mitt Romney is the grandson of President Jimmy Carter.

James Carter IV uncovered the tape of Mitt Romney telling wealthy supporters at a private fundraiser that 47 percent of Americans are dependent on government handouts.

On the video, Romney said, "There are 47% of the people who will vote for the president no matter what. All right, there are 47 percent who are with him, who are dependent on the government, who think they are victims, who believe the government has a responsibility to care for them."

Jimmy Carter IV, a researcher for the liberal magazine Mother Jones, tweeted this about his scoop:  "My biggest story yet. I've been searching for clips on Republicans for a long time, almost every day. I just do it for fun," the 36-year-old Carter was quoted as saying. [Source: New York Magazine]

Commentators are split on the seriousness of the misstep. On Good Morning America, George Stephanoupolus asked political analyst Matt Dowd, "Where does this register on the richter scale?"

"At somewhere between 6 & 7 on the richter scale. So it does some damage I think," said Dowd.

Mitt Romney tried some damage control in a late night news conference, saying, "It's not elegantly stated, let me put it that way. I'm speaking off the cuff in response to a question, and I'm sure I could state it more clearly and in a more effective way."

The $50,000-a-plate fundraiser was held in May at the sprawling Florida estate of a billionaire Romney supporter.
Romney's off-the-cuff gaffe is being compared to remarks made by President Obama during the 2008 campaign in which he said Republicans were bitter and cling to their guns and religion.

And Donald Trump fired President Obama in a spoof video in which a look-a-like plays the president. In the video, Trump says, "President Obama, you're fired. The fact is, the American people want results."

It was scheduled to be shown on the first night of the Republican convention, but  was cancelled because of Hurricane Isaac.

Trump told INSIDE EDITION's Paul Boyd, "I'm a little surprised, the world was surprised that it wasn't used because it really is very hard-hitting, and I think most people would say, extremely well-done. People love the video."