Some Female Athletes Turn To Breast Reductions For Competitive Edge

Some Female Athletes Turn To Breast Reductions For Competitive Edge

The biggest hurdle for some curvy athletes? It may be their own breasts.

"The sport pushes us to be breastless little girls as long as possible," says gold medal winning gymnast Dominique Moceanu of the 1996 Magnificent Seven. She told ESPN Magazine some coaches even monitor what gymnasts eat to delay puberty.

Now, breast reduction surgery is a growing trend among some athletes.

One fitness instructor with Double D breasts says, she's had enough. In just an hour of moderate jogging, her breasts will bounce several thousand times. Cameo Wichinsky has to use two sports bras for support and still has pain and discomfort when she runs.

"It's annoying. It's like carrying two 10 pound weights on your chest," said Wichinsky.

So, she's going to cosmetic surgeon Michelle Spring in Marina del Rey, California to have her breasts reduced.

"More and more athletes are coming in because they recoginze that something can be done and it may improve their level of competitiveness," said Dr. Spring.

Dr. Spring told Wichinsky, "I think you will be very happy having less tissue."

Wichinsky wants smaller, firmer, higher breasts by going from a size Double D to a small C. The surgery takes about an hour-and-a-half.

"Her breasts are a lot perkier. They are smaller," noted Dr. Spring.

Three weeks later, the results are revealed. When she exercises, she's no longer in pain.
"It felt amazing," she exclaimed.

Of course, not all athletes agree that large breasts pose a disadvantage. Serena Williams just won her 17th Grand Slam at the U.S. Open and she never shys from emphasizing her curves.  

Felow tennis star Caroline Wozniacki infamously 'busted' out an impression of Williams last year.  

But for many other women athletes, being full figured is no joke, and they're taking extraordinary steps to do something about it.