Nation Marks 50th Anniversary of John F. Kennedy Assassination

Nation Marks 50th Anniversary of John F. Kennedy Assassination

The nation comes to a standstill as we mark the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

At rain-soaked Dealey Plaza in Dallas where the president was shot, a moment of silence was followed by the singing of "America The Beautiful."

There was the solemn scene at the eternal flame, JFK's grave at Arlington National Cemetery.

At 1:29 p.m. Eastern Time, the TV networks went live to share the commemoration of JFK's assassination with the nation, just as TV first delivered the devastating bulletin 50 years ago.

Just about everyone alive in 1963 remembers where they were on that fateful day. INSIDE EDITION asked several public figures, "Where were you?"
Dr. Phil McGraw told INSIDE EDITION, "As you look back over your life, there are certain events that stand out for you. This was the first, kind of grown-up event that stood out that had an impact on me."

Barbara Walters told INSIDE EDITION, "I was a writer on the Today show when the assassination took place. And they needed to put people on the air because they didn't have enough reporters. I was in front of the Capitol talking about who was coming in and going out. It was not only something I will never forget, but it was the very first time that I was ever on the air."

Whoopi Goldberg told INSIDE EDITION, "I was at school because, I think I was eight. We heard bing, bong, bing, and one of the nuns said, "We're going to be leaving the school in an orderly fashion. Eveyrone get up. You're going to be going home."

Larry King recalled with INSIDE EDITION, "What I remember most is silence. Everybody quiet, walking around in kind of a stupor."

Arsenio Hall told INSIDE EDITION, "My most vivid memory as a young man, and it's probably because I was kid, was seening John John in black and white footage, salute his father."

Watch TV Personalities Remember Where They Were When JFK Was Assassinated

Remembrances of things past, from those who can never forget where they were on November, 22, 1963.