Were Money Woes a Factor in Robin Williams' Suicide?

Were Money Woes a Factor in Robin Williams' Suicide?

Was Robin Williams going broke?

Once worth an estimated $130 million, Williams had to put his gorgeous dream home in California's Napa Valley on the market.

Finance expert Lauren Lyons Cole told INSIDE EDITION, "If you're a performer or an athlete or someone who's getting big chunks of money that come, and then sometimes you might go for a long time without the next project, so, cash flow could definitely be an issue."

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Williams freely admitted money was an important reason why he decided to return to television in the CBS series The Crazy Ones, which was cancelled after one season.

Last September, Williams told Parade magazine, "The idea of having a steady job is appealing. There are bills to pay. My life has downsized, in a good way. I'm selling the ranch up in Napa. I just can't afford it anymore."  

His spectacular Napa Valley ranch is called Villa Sorriso. It comes with its own vineyard and a man-made lake. The sprawling mansion has five bedrooms, all with stunning views. It has a wood-paneled library, and a state-of-the-art home theater.  

Last year Williams put the jaw-dropping estate up for sale for $35 million. No one bid so he recently reduced the price to $29.5 million. 

"I think the fact that Robin Williams was selling his home is actually just a really typical move. A lot of people get to be 60 and they start considering, 'Do I want to downsize?'" said Cole.

Williams was twice divorced. He told Parade magazine, "Divorce is expensive. I used to joke they were going to call it 'all the money,' but they changed it to 'alimony.' It's ripping your heart out through your wallet."

Williams was also known for his generosity. He paid many of the medical bills for the late Christopher Reeve, who was paralyzed in a horse jumping accident.

Williams reportedly set up trust funds to ensure the financial future for his three children, but was worried he was running out of money to leave them. 

"That does tend to lead to greater amounts of depression. And I think from a financial perspective, that might be because you don't feel in control," said Cole.