Golf Star's Secret Weapon?

Golf Star's Secret Weapon?

Move over, Tiger Woods: golf has a new rising star.

In a stunning victory on Sunday, 22-year-old Rory McIlroy came back stronger than ever with a record-breaking U.S. Open win. But did you notice the bracelet on the superstar's wrist?  He claims it gives him an edge, but does it actually work?

The popular bracelet, made by a company called Trion Z, claims to have something called "magnetic and ionic technology." McIlroy, a paid spokesman for the company, said on their website: "Trion Z is an important tool that helps maintain my focus and gives me great confidence in my abilities on and off the course."

And McIlroy isn't the only celebrity to wear these so-called power bracelets. From reality stars like Audrina Patridge, to real actors like Mark Wahlberg and Kevin Dillon, Hollywood loves the trend. And all kinds of royalty—from political king Bill Clinton to an authentic Princess Kate—have also been spotted wearing the gear.  

Some of the most popular bracelets are made by a company called Power Balance.  During impressive company demonstrations, Power Balance bracelets appear to show an improvement in balance and strength.

But Yale University neurologist Steven Novella isn't convinced. In fact, he showed INSIDE EDITION'S Lisa Guerrero how a common object can work just as well.

Using car keys, Novella pushed hard on Lisa's arm. To her amazement, she didn't fall over. But Novella said the "magic" was merely physics. "When I want you to fall over, I push straight down. When I don't want you to fall I just push inwards the slightest bit. It's just physics, you're not going to fall over. It looks very compelling, if you don't know what's going on," he said.

Power Balance insists that there are no gimmicks involved, and that their products really work.

As for Rory McIlroy, whatever he's doing, there's no doubt it's working.

Trion Z, the company that makes the bracelets worn by Rory McIlroy, ays they make no scientific claims about their products.