Georgia Bicyclist Carries Wounded Dog on His Back, Finds Him Forever Home in Maine

Animals - Inside Edition Staff

A mountain biker wasn't about to leave the 5-month-old wounded stray he found near a Georgia sewage treatment facility.

Out for a ride with a group of cyclists, Jarrett Little came upon the Great Dane mix in a sorry state. The pup's back leg was broken, a toe on his front paw was fractured and he was covered in road rash. It looked, Little said, as if he the dog had been struck by a car.

The poor thing couldn't really walk, so Little hoisted him, piggy-back style, and got on his bike for the seven-mile ride into downtown Columbus.

Little and another rider had already decided one of them would take the puppy home if they couldn't find a home for the dog.

At a local bike shop, where they took the dog to get some water and food, the dog took an immediate liking to a woman named Andrea Shaw, who was in town on a business trip. He gave her a good licking and sidled right up to her.

The dog's future home was a done deal. Shaw was going to take him and get him medical help.

She named him Columbo, in honor of the town she found him in. He was friendly and happy, despite his wounds.

"You can see why I didn't leave him on the sidewalk in Columbus," she told InsideEdition.com.

At the vet, his bottom half was shaved and he received 25 staples in his hind leg, where four pins were inserted to stabilize his broken bone. He received a full cast on his front leg to protect his broken toe. Around his head went a cone of shame to keep him from worrying his wounds.

He rode to Maine in a Canine Freedom Transportation van, courtesy of the rescue organization that ferries rescued animals up and down the East Coast.

Shaw started a Facebook page in Columbo's honor. His nickname is "Bo."

"The Adventures of Columbo" is full of photos and written in a first-canine narrative. 

"The dog doesn't have a mean or grumpy bone in his body," Shaw said. "And God knows he has every reason to."

Life on a horse farm seems to suit Bo just fine. The horses like him. Shaw's two coon hounds like him. "My 5-year-old son is madly in love with him," Shaw said.

 

Bo must stay in padded crate while his leg heasl, but he gets bathroom breaks and laps from the horses' water buckets.

"I already can't imagine what it would be like without him, and it's only been a week," she said.