The World Reacts to Tiger's Statement

The World Reacts to Tiger's Statement

As Tiger Woods made his extraordinary apology, the nation came to a halt, with all the major broadcast networks breaking into regular programming to carry the historic event live.

At ABC, George Stephanopoulos said, "One of the most remarkable public apologies ever."

In New York's Times Square, people stopped in their tracks to watch Woods close to tears on a giant screen. At the ESPN Zone, all eyes were fixed on the TV sets.

Debate raged across the airwaves on whether Woods was genuine.

A CNN commentator said,  "I really believe this was an embarrassing performance."

A CNN anchor said, "How many times does the guy have to say 'I'm sorry?' "

"I thought he was sincere," said an NBC commentator.

INSIDE EDITION spoke to nationally syndicated radio psychologist Dr. Joy Browne, who said, "I don't think it was an apology at all. I really don't. I think it was self-serving. I think there was not one moment of personal anguish in it. He read a speech."

Image expert Marvet Britto says the apology was the real deal, telling INSIDE EDITION, "Tiger Woods showed genuine remorse by maintaining eye contact, by speaking directly to those he felt he affected. You really saw and felt a sense of emotion. You connected with him immediately."

No matter what you thought of Woods's confession, it's certain to go down as one of the most compelling live events in TV history, comparable to the O.J. Simpson verdict in 1995 and Michael Jackson's memorial in 2009.