Quadruplet Brothers All Get Accepted to Elite Colleges, Including Harvard and Yale: 'We All Work Hard Together

Quadruplet brothers were all accepted to Harvard, Yale and a slew of other prestigious colleges across the country.

It's just another accomplishment for the four, who are outstanding athletes and students, and extremely grateful to their parents for instilling in them the virtue of working hard.

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The Wades — Aaron, Nigel, Nick and Zachary — have garnered national attention since they were accepted by imminent campuses including Harvard, Yale and the University of California at Berkeley.

"It’s really our parents, our friends and our community who have come together and taught us how to be disciplined," Nigel told the Hamilton-Middletown Journal News.

"We feel like getting into these schools show who the people around us are," he said. "We all work hard together."

The 18-year-olds were bombarded with offers, but haven’t decided which schools to attend.

Nick also got into Duke, Georgetown and Stanford. Nigel was also accepted to Johns Hopkins and Vanderbilt, while Zach also got into Cornell.

The Lakota East High School seniors were stunned.

“To have one child from a family to be accepted to a school like this is amazing," Zach told The Washington Post. “But for all four to be accepted, I  just don’t – I don’t know how it happened.”

Parents Darrin and Kim always taught their kids that responsibility and hard work led to a limitless life. Their dad works at General Electric and their mom is a middle school principal.

Their sons are academic leaders and active in sports.

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A determining factor in their college choices is financial aid, the teens said. Their parents have saved money for their educations, but it’s not enough to pay four tuitions at elite universities.

Darrin said he and his wife want to make sure they have enough put away to take care of themselves in their retirement.

“We have to make sure that we’re helping them down the road by not being a financial burden on them when we get older,” he said.

The teens say they haven’t picked a major, either.

"We still have to make those decisions," Nick said. "We’re just shocked. We still don’t believe that we got in."

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