Conrad Murray Behind Bars After Guilty Verdict

Conrad Murray Behind Bars After Guilty Verdict

Dr. Conrad Murray spent his first night in jail at Los Angeles's Twin Towers Correctional Facility all alone in a 9-by-11-foot cell with just a thin mattress, stainless steel sink and toilet.

He's on routine suicide watch in a unit housing high-profile inmates. He's classified as a "keep away prisoner," with guards watching him at all times.

Murray woke up this morning to a breakfast menu that included his choice of scrambled eggs, pancakes, toast and orange juice.

He now faces up to four years in prison. But there's growing controversy over how much jail time he'll actually serve.

By remanding Dr. Murray into custody with no bail, the judge may be sending a clear message about what to expect when it comes time for sentencing on November 29th.

Tom Mesereau, Michael Jackson's former lawyer, expects Murray will receive the maximum sentence.

Mesereau told INSIDE EDITION, "He may sentence him to four years. Now because it's not intentional homicide, and because of overcrowding, and good time credits and other conditions, he may do a lot less than that, and he may do some of it in home detention."

Judge Jackie Glass, host of the syndicated court show Swift Justice, also expects the judge to be harsh in sentencing.

Glass told INSIDE EDITION, "Unfortunately, because it's only involuntary manslaughter, there's only up to four years that Dr. Murray can get. It doesn't seem quite appropriate a punishment for causing someone's death."

Backstage at Dancing with the Stars, Nancy Grace told INSIDE EDITION what she thinks Murray's sentence should be.

"Conrad Murray needs to stay behind bars for the rest of his life. The one thing Conrad Murray got, a one-way ticket to hell. So enjoy that ride, Murray," said Grace.

The two medical experts whose testimony was critical to the jury's decision are also reacting to the verdict.

You'll remember star prosecution witness Dr. Steven Shafer said Murray gave Michael Jackson the fatal overdose of Propofol.

Shafer said, "I think justice was served. Conrad Murray violated the doctor-patient relationship."

His former professor, Dr. Paul White, who said on the stand that Jackson injected himself with the powerful anesthetic, had this to say about the verdict the entire nation is talking about:

"I was, I guess you would say disappointed. I wasn't surprised however because I think following the judge's instructions, it was predictable they were going to return a guilty verdict," said White.