Logan Paul's Brother Finally Opens Up About YouTube Star's Controversy: 'He Didn't Mean to Offend Anyone'

Playing Ex-Disney Star Jake Paul Responds to Brother Logan Paul's YouTube Controversy

The brother of Logan Paul has opened up about the YouTube vlogger's troubles in the wake of the now-infamous "suicide forest" video.

Jake Paul, a former Disney Channel star, posted a clip on the same video-sharing site where his brother was once a top star before an ill-advised visit to Japan's Aokigahara forest.

"I think what Logan did was very wrong. He made a huge mistake," the younger Paul said, referring to his brother's decision to show a victim of suicide in a YouTube video. "Not only is he paying for it. He's learning from it."

On Dec. 31, Logan Paul posted the video of his visit to Aokigahara forest, a well-known destination for people looking to end their own lives, before taking it down amid claims he was using the sad scene in a bid to increase his viewership.

Before it was deleted, the video was viewed some six million times.

In one of two apologies, Paul wrote that he "intended to raise awareness for suicide and suicide prevention."

"He did not mean to offend anyone," Jake Paul said in his clip. "I can tell when hes in shock. He didn’t handle the situation the right way but I know in the back of his head he didn’t mean to offend or hurt anyone."

In the wake of the fallout, YouTube has limited the scope of its relationship with Logan Paul, removing his channel from Google Preferred.

YouTube also chose not to release several episodes of Logan Paul's original series. 

He has taken a break from vlogging since the incident. His brother says he's using that time to learn from his mistake.

"Since he is that strong person, he is going to learn from his mistakes," Jake Paul said. "And be able to bounce back."

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