Demi Lovato Hospitalized for Apparent Overdose: Report

Playing Demi Lovato Hospitalized for Apparent Overdose in California: Report

Demi Lovato has been hospitalized for what is believed to be an overdose, according to a report.

The singer was rushed to a Los Angeles hospital at about noon Tuesday after being treated with Narcan following a heroin overdose at her home in the Hollywood Hills, TMZ reported.

However, a source close to Lovato told People that the overdose is not heroin-related. People reported that Lovato is stable. 

Lovato, 25, has been open in the past about her struggle with substance abuse and self-harm.

She has also grappled with depression and bipolar disorder her entire life, and even contemplated suicide at just 7 years old.

"I knew that if I were to take my own life, the pain would end," she said in an interview with Dr. Phil McGraw earlier this year. "I turned to cutting and there was a while there where my mom was afraid to wake me up in the mornings. She didn’t know if she opened the door whether I would be alive or not. Every time I cut, it got deeper and deeper."

She abruptly left her tour with the Jonas Brothers at the height of her Disney Channel fame to seek treatment, and joined a sober living facility shortly after. 

Last month, she released a surprise track called “Sober,” in which she hinted at a relapse, and apologized for letting down her friends, family and fans.

"Demi relapsed and started drinking alcohol again," a source told Entertainment Tonight. "Her song is intense, but that's how she deals. She has to be brutally honest and put it out there so that she's not burdened with holding on to her struggles privately."

The relapse came shortly after her celebration of six years sober in March.

Inside Edition has reached out to Lovato's representatives for comment.

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