Was Freddie Gray Taken on a Wild Ride Inside Police Van?

Was Freddie Gray subjected to a so-called "rough ride" in that police van?

INSIDE EDITION’s Jim Moret wanted to find out what can happen in the back of a paddy wagon when you're not belted in.

Read: Freddie Gray's Police Van Made Unexplained Stop Before He Died in Police Custody

Moret said, “My hands and legs are tied but to protect myself from any potential injury, I’m wearing a helmet and pads."

Freddie Gray was not belted into the van, which is a direct violation of police policy. Like Gray, Moret was placed on the floor of the van and they began moving at slow speed.

Once inside the van, Moret talked about his experience, “Freddie Gray was in that van for 40 minutes, I have been in that van for about 15 minutes and I am exhausted. I'm jolted, tossed around, and I feel totally helpless. I'm also scared.”

Moret discussed the physical toll it had on his body, "If I didn't have this elbow pad I think I would have hurt it by now. It hurts already. I have padding on my knees and my elbows and I keep banging into the side of the van." 

Read: Six Police Officers Charged in Death of Freddie Gray

INSIDE EDITION spoke to Chuck Drago, a 30-year police veteran. He said, "The officer may drive erratically to cause the prisoner to slide around in the car. That is why the officer won't put a seat belt on him. Obviously, there is still great potential for causing injury. He hit his face, he hit his nose, he hit his head." 

In Baltimore it’s known as a "rough ride,” but other cities use other phrases like a "nickel ride" or a "joy ride."

The van carrying Freddie Gray made four stops in 46 minutes before arriving at the police station where he was carried out of the van not breathing.

Moret said, “I can tell you from firsthand experience, it's terrifying.”

Watch Below: Six Officers Charged in Death of Freddie Gray