Woman Who Hoarded Nearly 50 Dogs Was Reportedly Eaten By Pets After She Died

Woman Who Hoarded Nearly 50 Dogs Was Reportedly Eaten By Pets After She Died

A reported Arkansas animal hoarder was eaten by her dogs after she died inside her overcrowded home.

The 65-year-old woman, whose identity has not been released, was found in August dead and partially eaten inside her Van Buren County home after having suffered from Hepatitis C, KARK-TV reported.

Read: 5-Year-Old Boy is Mauled to Death By 2 Dogs

Deputies discovered nearly 50 malnourished dogs-- some extremely aggressive-- on the property and were reportedly forced to shoot and kill some to get to the woman.

“It was just a situation I don't want to go through again,” Van Buren County Animal Control Director Reta Tharp told the Huffington Post.

A veterinarian was also bitten during the incident.

The woman's death was announced this week, after authorities had returned to the property where they killed an additional 27 dogs, according to KARK-TV.

The dogs were never vaccinated and some were inbred and sick, Tharp recalled, saying that authorities had done "all we can do to protect the community."

About eight dogs are still on the property and will either be captured or killed.

Arkansas State Health Department reportedly said it believes animals cannot spread Hepatitis C.

The woman had been forced to part with 103 dogs three years ago, according to reports.

"At that time it was easier to deal with because she was there and she could help us," Tharp told the Huffington Post.

It was not immediately clear how the woman came to own the dogs.

Read: Mummified Body and 300 Bottles of Urine Removed From Hoarder's Home

According to the ASPCA, there are an estimated 900 to 2,000 new cases of animal hoarding each year in the U.S. and approximately a quarter million animals are involved.

"Animal hoarding is covered implicitly under every state's animal cruelty statute, which typically requires caretakers to provide sufficient food, water and veterinary care," according to the ASPCA’s website.

Watch Below: How You Should React During a Dog Attack