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After Brazilian Soccer Disaster, How to Increase Your Odds of Survival in a Plane Crash


Following the catastrophic plane crash in Colombia where 71 people perished, including many from a Brazilian soccer club, there are ways to boost your chances of survival should you find yourself in such a harrowing situation.

Read: Brazilian Goalkeeper Made Final Phone Call to His Wife Before Dying From Plane Crash Injuries

Six of the people on board the doomed plane, including three Chapecoense Football Club players, two crew people and a journalist survived Tuesday morning’s doomed flight.

In some cases, your likelihood of survival may come down to where you are seated on the plane.

The back of the plane is usually safer than the front. Aisle seats are safer than window seats and seats within five rows of an exit are safest in terms of getting out in the event of a fire

Aviation expert John Lucich says simple things can keep you alive.

"Number 1, you want to make sure you are wearing flat shoes," Lucich told Inside Edition. "Number 2, you want to make sure you are wearing comfortable clothes in case you have to climb or reach or have to get out somehow, you can do so easily.

"Also, you want to make sure you know where your seat is and where the exit row is so you know how many rows are in front of you and in how many rows are in back of you," he said. 

The Discovery Channel deliberately crashed an unmanned plane in the desert in 2012 in hopes of finding the information to help travelers get out alive.

Cameras mounted inside recorded the impact and sensors measured the effects on crash test dummies. The video shows that bracing for impact with your head down and hands locked behind your head dramatically increases the odds of survival.

One of the survivors of the Aerospace 146 short-haul plane carrying the Chapecoense soccer team believes he cheated death.

Read: 71 Killed After Plane Carrying Brazilian Soccer Team Crashes in Colombia

"I put the bags in between my legs to form the fetal position that is recommended in accidents," survivor and crew member Erwin Tumiri told Fox Sports Argentina.

The team, along with journalists and the plane’s crew, were on their way to Medellin, Colombia, to play the first leg of the Copa Sudamericana against Colombian team Atletico Nacional before it crashed near the city where they were supposed to land.

Before the plane slammed into the Andes Mountains, Tumiri said many passengers stood up from their seats and were shouting, while he curled up like a baby. He claims doing this helped him get out alive.

According to reports, the cause of the crash was lack of fuel.

Watch: Brazilian Soccer Player Killed in Plane Crash Found Out He Was Going to Be a Dad a Week Ago

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