Pilot Flies Small Plane Into IRS Building in Austin

Pilot Flies Small Plane Into IRS Building in Austin

It's a scene frighteningly reminiscent of 9/11. An office building in flames after a plane crashes right into it.

This time it was in Austin, Texas. A single engine plane was deliberately flown into the building housing 200 employees of the IRS.

"Hi, I can't get to the phone right now, but if you leave a message I'll get back to you as soon as I get the chance."

That's the voice mail of the pilot, identified as Joseph Andrew Stack. Here's what we know about him. He's a 53-year-old software engineer. He is licensed to fly single engine planes. He had an ongoing feud with the IRS, and deliberately targeted the building. By some miracle, the only casualty appears to be the crazed pilot.

His on-line manifesto is filled with rantings against the government such as:

"Well Mr. Big Brother IRS man, take my pound of flesh and sleep well."

"Violence is the only answer. The inquisition is still alive and well today in this country."

He calls his life an "American nightmare."

Eerily, the manifesto is signed "Joe Stack" and was updated just Thursday morning with these ominous dates: 1956-2010.

Stack apparently set his own house on fire right before crashing the plane. His wife and teenage daughter were in the house at the time. They fled and were rescued by a neighbor.