Twin Brothers Have Been Helping Those in Need Since Age 4: 'We Were Taught to Give'

Playing Meet the Teen Twins Who Have Been Helping the Needy for Over 10 Years

Since they were little boys, New Jersey twins Jake and Max Klein have carried big hearts brimming with empathy.

At age 4, they emptied their piggy banks and told their parents they wanted to buy Christmas presents for children who had none.

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Now 15, the Edgewater teens run their own nonprofit website, Kids That Do Good, which shares hundreds of ways for kids across the country to help their neighbors.

“From an early age, we were taught that we should give back and we were more fortunate than others,” Jake told InsideEdition.com Thursday.

“We found that even in our own community, there were people that were less fortunate than us,” he said. “So we wanted to give back.”

The boys have given laptops to the neighborhood fire department and bulletproof vests to police officers.

They’ve sold cookies to raise money for pediatric cancer treatments and asked family and friends to donate money instead of birthday gifts so the twins could buy food for the local food pantry.

One of Max’s best donation memories is of giving a Jaws of Life auto rescue tool to the fire department. “It saved so many lives,” he said. “I couldn’t believe how cool it was that I got to give one of those back to my community.”

Their dad, Mark, and their mom, Sandy, taught the twins to make a difference, to help others, to empathize instead of judging and to value kindness above video games.

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“It feels awesome being this young and making an impact,” Jake said. “It shows that anyone at an early age can make an impact.

“Doesn’t matter the age you are, or how tall you are, you can make an impact at any age,” he said.

Max estimates that he and his brother have each put about 1,000 hours into volunteering and raising money for the community.

He hopes that kids who register on his website will top 100,000 hours of volunteering by the end of 2017.

“We’re not gonna stop with this,” his brother declared. “We’re going to keep going until it’s the No. 1 resource for charitable work.”

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