Could Cindy Anthony Profit From Casey Anthony's Trial?

Could Cindy Anthony Profit From Casey Anthony's Trial?

Casey Anthony's mother Cindy was spotted meeting with a top Florida financial advisor.

Her sit-down with J. Michael Bass, president of PrimeQuest Wealth Strategies, is triggering speculation she may have signed a lucrative book or movie deal.  

What can she say to try and defend that? It obviously looks as though they're greedy and thinking about money first, even before they're thinking about putting their family unit back together," says image consultant Mike Paul.

But Casey Anthony's chances of making money from a book or TV interview are quickly diminishing.

Facebook pages calling for a boycott of any Casey Anthony book or movie have more than 300,000 supporters.

Jerry Springer is denouncing a report that he was negotiating to pay Casey $1 million for an interview.

"This woman should not profit. No one should be paying her. I would never do it. Ever," Springer told photographers.

Meanwhile, Casey is preparing to answer the tough questions about Caylee's death she was never asked during the trial.

"I'm getting e-mails, thousands of e-mails, from all across America urging me and saying please get the truth," says John Morgan, the attorney who represents Zenaida Gonzalez, the woman suing Casey for falsely identifying her as the nanny who kidnapped little Caylee.

Casey is scheduled to give a deposition just two days after her release on July 17th.

"We are going to spend a lot of time on exactly what happened. Where were you? When was the last time you saw Caylee Anthony? How did she die? How do you know that she died? What did you do with her body afterward?" Morgan says.

And one of the jurors who found Casey not guilty is in hiding, in fear for her life.

Juror #12, a cook with two children, was too afraid to return to work and left Florida because of the public fury over the verdict.

"I'd rather go to jail than sit on a jury like that again," her husband quoted her as saying.

And the jury foreman is also breaking his silence. He spoke with Fox News's Greta Van Susteren, but he's so afraid he will not allow his face to be shown.

He says jurors were suspicious of Casey's father.

"Anyone think George was believable or credible or were others likewise suspicious of him?" Van Susteren asked.

"There was a suspicion of him. That was a part of our conversation when we were doing deliberation," he said.