Steve Jobs Biography Reveals Surprising Details

Steve Jobs Biography Reveals Surprising Details

Billionaire Steve Jobs was renowned for his sharp imagination, but a new biography reveals that he had an equally sharp tongue.

Jobs had these startling words in a face-to-face meeting with President Obama: "You're headed for a one-term presidency."

Jobs was urging Obama to adopt a more pro-business policy, according to biographer Walter Isaacson.

Jobs was adopted. He revealed the bizarre way he finally met his biological father.

"It turns out he managed or owned a restaurant and I was in that restaurant once or twice. And I remember meeting the owner who was from Syria and it was most certainly him. And I shook his hand and he shook my hand, and that's all."

Isaacson told 60 Minutes, "Jobs never spoke to him. Never talked to him. Never got in touch with him. Never wanted to see him."

Jobs died of pancreatic cancer earlier this month at his Palo Alto, California, home. But Isaacson tells 60 Minutes this Sunday Jobs might have lived if he hadn't delayed having surgery.

60 Minutes correspondent Steve Kroft asked, "Why doesn't he get it operated on immediately?"

"I asked him that. He said, 'I didn't want my body to be opened. I didn't want to be violated that way.' He was regretful of that," said Isaacson.

Isaacson conducted a remarkable forty interviews with the reclusive Jobs and emerged with some remarkable edgy comments about his competitors.

Regarding Microsoft mogul Bill Gates, Jobs said, "Bill is basically unimaginative and has never invented anything, which is why he's more comfortable now in philanthropy than technology. He just shamelessly ripped off other people's ideas."

The book says Jobs once got into a shouting match with Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin, after accusing them of ripping off Apple technology in developing their Android smartphone.

"I'm going to destroy Android, because it's a stolen product. I'm willing to go thermonuclear war on this. I will spend my last dying breath if I need to, and I will spend every penny of Apple's $40 billion in the bank, to right this wrong," said Jobs.

Jobs wished he'd listened to his doctors instead of waiting too long to have surgery, according to Isaacson.

Kroft asked, "How could a smart man do such a stupid thing?"

"I think that he kind of felt that if you ignore something, if you don't want something to exist, you can have magical thinking. And it had worked for him in the past. He regretted it," said Isaacson.