350-Pound Dancer Proud To Strut Her Stuff

350-Pound Dancer Proud To Strut Her Stuff

At 350 pounds, Whitney Thore is living large.

Thore told INSIDE EDITOIN, "Just because I'm 350 pound doesn't mean I'm not light on my feet."

Thore wears a body hugging T-shirt that reads "No B.S." but it's not what you might think. "No B.S." stands for "No Body Shaming."  

"When people look at my body, they make assupmtions that I'm super unhealthy, that I'm lazy. I dont deserve to dance in public if I want to, and I dont even deserve to feel good about myself," she said.

Watch More Of Thore's Interview

Twenty-nine-year-old Thore is a radio producer, but her passion has always been dance. She has no inhibitions performing her pulsating routine in front of a group.

Thore said, "I'm a fat girl dancing and I'm proud of it."

Her "fat girl dancing" video is all over YouTube.

She has struggled with her weight since she was a little girl.

"I always felt fat. I was made fun of when I weighed 90 pounds," she recalled.

In college, Thore pursued dance and had a 120-pound perfectly toned dancer's body.

"Being a dancer, my ability to dance was tied to my weight. If I could just be thinner, I would be better," said Thore.

The Greensboro, North Caronlina, native says her weight gain was baffling because she ate healthy. She couldn't understand why she easily gained weight despite exercising so much.

She told INSIDE EDITION, "I've been made fun of for my thunder thighs. I've been told to suck in. I've been spit on. I've been assaulted. I've been called a pig. I've been snorted at."

Turns out, there was a medical explanation. She was diagnosed with an incurable disorder, polycystic ovary syndrome, a hormonal disorder that  triggers inexplicable weight gain.

Thore has come to accept her size. When she looks in the mirror, all she sees is a beautiful woman who happens to weigh 350 pounds.

"It's a fat body. It's curvy and soft. It's mine and it's beauitful and I love it," she declared.

She hopes her dancing videos will encourage people to go out and live their lives, no matter what their shape and size.

Thore conclued, "When I look at myself I see me, and that's a lot more than 350 pounds."