131-Year-Old Statue Honoring Confederate General Robert E. Lee Is Finally Taken Down in Virginia | Inside Edition

131-Year-Old Statue Honoring Confederate General Robert E. Lee Is Finally Taken Down in Virginia

Monuments honoring the pro-slavery Confederacy have been coming down in several states. This Lee statue has been one of the biggest targets, becoming a site of protests and witness.

It’s the second fall of Robert E. Lee.

A huge bronze statue of the military leader of the Confederacy finally came down this week to the cheers of onlookers.

For the past 131 years, the 13-ton likeness sat in a place of honor in Richmond, Virginia.

Richmond was the capital of the Confederacy during the US Civil War. The Virginia city continued to celebrate Confederate leaders since the South’s defeat in 1865.

But for many, the statue was a monument to white supremacy.

As the U.S. continues to reckon with its legacy of slavery and racial injustice, monuments honoring the pro-slavery Confederacy have been coming down in several states.

This Lee statue has been one of the biggest targets, becoming a site of protests and witness.

On the occasion of its removal, spectators shared their joy with CBS News.

“It’s about time,” an onlooker said. “It’s nice to be part of history.”

“Monuments like these are no longer necessary,” another added.  “It should be a space for everyone to come and feel welcome.”

Reportedly, the hunk of bronze is headed for storage.

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