CDC Updates Dog Import Guidelines to Suspend Entry From Countries With High Rabies Risk | Inside Edition

CDC Updates Dog Import Guidelines to Suspend Entry From Countries With High Rabies Risk

Dog receiving rabies vaccine by gloved handsDog receiving rabies vaccine by gloved hands
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Because the U.S. eliminated rabies in 2007, it is imperative that the virus is not brought into the country from dogs that have not been properly vaccinated, the CDC said.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suspended the import of dogs from countries with a high risk of rabies.

Because the U.S. eliminated rabies in 2007, it is imperative that the virus is not brought into the country from dogs that have not been properly vaccinated, the Center says.

"This action is necessary to ensure the health and safety of dogs imported into the United States and to protect the public's health against the reintroduction of canine rabies virus variants (dog rabies). The suspension is temporary and will be reviewed periodically." the CDC said in a statement. 

2020 showed a sharp increase in the cases of dogs that were denied entry. “Due to reduced flight schedules, dogs denied entry are facing longer wait times to be returned to their country of departure, leading to illness and even death in some cases.” the CDC says.

According to the CDC, rabies is extremely dangerous and fatal if not treated quickly or properly. There's no reliable cure, although vaccines can prevent it after exposure.

New CDC guidelines say that a special permit can be requested six weeks before your arrival if you are coming from a high-risk area, but is granted only on a case-by-case basis.

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