Human Rights Groups and Protesters in Hungary Inflate Giant Rainbow Heart to Protest New Anti-LGBTQ+ Law | Inside Edition

Human Rights Groups and Protesters in Hungary Inflate Giant Rainbow Heart to Protest New Anti-LGBTQ+ Law

This new legislation prohibits the depiction of homosexuality in television shows, films and advertisements for young people. It also prohibits organizations from conducting educational programs on sexual orientation without government approval.

Protesters in Hungary inflated a giant rainbow heart in front of the country’s parliament building in Budapest.

The activists were protesting new legislation in the eastern European country that prohibits the depiction of homosexuality in television shows, films and advertisements for young people.

“We think that this law is completely against all kinds of human rights standards," said Luca Dudits, a spokesperson from the Hungarian rights group the Hatter Society.

“This law stigmatizes LGBTQI people, and it actually puts LGBTQI youth more at risk and more in danger of bullying and harassment in schools, and in their families as well."

The law also prohibits organizations from conducting educational programs concerning sexual orientation in schools without government approval.

Anti-LGBTQ+ policies in Hungary are promoted by the right-wing government of Prime Minister Viktor Orban.

"The Hungarian society is not accepting this fundamentalist legislation,” a spokesperson from Amnesty International states. “According to the latest opinion survey, actually more than two-thirds of Hungarians think that this serves the purpose of marginalizing the LGBT community.”

"The Hungarian bill is a shame,” they added.

The law was also criticized by the European Union, which passed a resolution condemning it as a violation of “EU values, principles and law."

“This bill clearly discriminates against people on the basis of their sexual orientation, and it goes against all the values, the fundamental values of the European Union,” European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said.

“And this is human dignity, it is equality, and is the human fundamental rights.”

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