Identical Twin Toddlers With Down Syndrome Already Have a Modeling Contract

Playing Rare Twins With Down Syndrome Are 1 in a Million

Hannah and Rachel may only be 18 months old, but the British twins, who have Down syndrome, are already on their way to stardom.

The pair has already signed with contract with a modeling agency that specializes in people with disabilities.

Although they learn a little differently than other tots, Hannah and Rachel’s parents said they’ll hit all their milestones at their own pace. They are on track to learn sign language, English, Spanish and Italian.

“They won’t be defined by Down syndrome, but as girls with great capabilities, self-worth, feeling good about themselves,” their mom, Nardy Mejias, 37, told SWNS.

She said that she and her husband, Enzo Lattanzio, 48, of Basingstoke, England, only discovered their newborn twins had an extra chromosome three weeks after they were born.

They said they had regular scans and checkups while Mejias was pregnant, but there were no signs the twins would have Down syndrome. Both Hannah and Rachel were extremely healthy in the womb, including having strong hearts, which is uncommon in children with Down syndrome.

"If I had found out during the pregnancy, I would have been worried," Mejias said. "But if the baby is healthy, you do not need to worry about it."

She explained they didn’t know much about the condition before having the twins, but their family, which also includes three older children between the ages of 3 and 6, are quickly learning.

"They are learning everyday activities through their senses — tasting, touching, seeing, hearing and smelling — and they pick it up quickly," Mejias said. "There are so many things the twins are practicing because of their siblings."

Mejias said the twins, who wear hearing aids, take longer to learn certain skills and communicate best through sign language.

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