Archaeologists in China Find Well-Preserved Ming Dynasty-Era Fort Near the Great Wall | Inside Edition

Archaeologists in China Find Well-Preserved Ming Dynasty-Era Fort Near the Great Wall

The discovery was made near Yulin City, in northwestern China, and it is a major find.

Archaeologists in China recently unearthed the remains of a Great Wall fort that had been buried for hundreds of years. The Qingping Fort dates to the Ming Dynasty, which spanned from 1368 to 1644 A.D.

Researchers found two courtyards and several artifacts, all well-preserved. Those artifacts included several statues, which the archaeologists carefully cleaned with brushes.

The discovery was made near Yulin City, in northwestern China, and it is a major find.

Most think of the Great Wall of China as having been built for defense. But researchers from the Shaanxi Academy of Archaeology say that the military use of this particular fort was secondary and that it served primarily as a site for peaceful exchanges like trade and fairs.

The Great Wall consists of a series of forts. It’s anywhere from hundreds to thousands of years old and spans some 12,000 miles.

Famously, it is visible from space. And it’s been studied and traveled for centuries. But as this recent discovery shows, it still has plenty to teach us.

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