Britney Spears's Father Denied Request to Reclaim Full Control of Her Estate, Will Remain Co-Conservator | Inside Edition

Britney Spears's Father Denied Request to Reclaim Full Control of Her Estate, Will Remain Co-Conservator

Fans are worried about Britney Spears.
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Britney Spears' estate will remain shared between a third-party and her father, Jamie Spears, who has held control over the pop stars' finances, career, and well-being for 13 years, according to reports.

The #FreeBritney movement saga has continued after a judge decided Thursday that Britney Spears' estate will remain shared between a third-party and her father, Jamie Spears, who has held control over the pop stars' finances, career, and well-being for 13 years, according to reports.
 
The 39-year-old singer was placed in a legal conservatorship completely controlled by her father, Jamie, in 2008 after she was struggling with mental health concerns, CBS News reported. A conservatorship is more commonly imposed on elderly persons or someone with cognitive impairment, according to the California court system.
 
Last year, Britney's lawyer Samuel D. Ingham III told the court that she "strongly opposed" her father serving as her sole conservator and sought a third-party to hold control of her estate.
 
Her father was not removed from the conservatorship, but a third-party, Bessemer Trust, was added as co-conservator in November, Inside Edition Digital previously reported. Judge Brenda Penny rejected the singer's request to remove her father completely as a conservator.
 
In Thursday's hearing, Penny ordered that both Jamie Spears and Bessemer Trust collaborate together on a budget and investment plan for the pop star.
 
Still, Ingham reiterated Britney's sentiment that she does not want her father to play a role in her finances.
 
"It's no secret that my client does not want her father as her conservator but we recognize that removal is a separate issue," attorney Sam Ingham said, according to CBS News.
 
Jamie's attorney, Vivian Thoreen, called the co-conservatorship "unclear and ambiguous" which Ingham disputed saying that it is intended to be an "equal" split.
 
Jamie's legal team has asserted that Britney's estate went from being in debt to increase to a value of over $60 million while he has been conservator.
 
The parties are expected to return to court on March 17.

For the first time since the release of The New York Times documentary, “Framing Britney Spears,” Justin Timberlake has spoken out in response to recent backlash for the role some say he played in the media’s portrayal of Britney. The pair dated as teens for several years during what was reportedly the peak of both of their careers.

“I’ve seen the messages, tags, comments, and concerns and I want to respond,” Timberlake wrote in a statement posted to his Instagram Friday. “I am deeply sorry for the times in my life where my actions contributed to the problem, where I spoke out of turn, or did not speak up for what was right.”

“I understand that I fell short in these moments in many others and benefitted from a system that condones misogyny and racism," he wrote in the apology, which was also addressed to Janet Jackson.

Timberlake admitted to not being “perfect in navigating” the situation and said his apology, although it does not “absolve the past” is the “first step”.

He did not specifically cite any specific examples of his actions.
 

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