Theranos Founder Elizabeth Holmes Appears in Federal Court Wearing Grey Pantsuit | Inside Edition

Elizabeth Holmes Doesn't Think She's Done Anything Wrong, 'Bad Blood' Author Says

Disgraced Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes is due in a California federal court Monday on charges of fraud and conspiracy. 
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Disgraced Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes appeared in a California federal court Monday on charges of fraud and conspiracy.

Disgraced Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes appeared in a California federal court Monday on charges of fraud and conspiracy. 

She arrived wearing a grey pantsuit with a light blue button down. And her hair was messily pulled back — a low-maintenance style she became known for while running Theranos. 

At the brief status hearing, according to the San Francisco Gate, the judge suggested her trail start July 8. However, all parties agreed to have another status hearing on July 1, likely pushing the trial date back.

But she has seemed unconcerned with the prospect of possible prison time. Inside Edition recently tracked down Holmes living in a luxury rental building in San Francisco with her partner, Billy Evans, who is heir to a hotel chain. The two are reportedly engaged. 

Wall Street Journal reporter John Carreyrou told CNBC's "Power Lunch" Monday that he's not surprised that Holmes is "behaving like nothing is wrong."

"It doesn't surprise me at all," he said. "I think that she is someone who again and again has shown an inability to have qualms, to display regret or to even feel like she committed any wrongdoing."

Carreyrou authored the October 2015 article that eventually brought the company crashing down and has since written a book about the scandal, "Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup."

Theranos, a company once valued at more than $9 billion, was once hailed as innovative for its breakthrough technology that claimed it could perform hundreds of lab tests using only a couple drops of blood. 

"I think the most that she's allowed in conversations with friends and family is that mistakes were committed by the company, but she's not necessarily copping to the mistakes herself and she's certainly not accepting of the fact that anything wrong was done by her," he said. 

"At no point did she apologize," he added.

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