Illinois Man Dies While Hiking in Grand Canyon National Park | Inside Edition

Illinois Man Dies While Hiking in Grand Canyon National Park

View from Navajo Point at the south rim of the Grand Canyon on January 10, 2021 in Grand Canyon Village, Arizona
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This is the second death in Grand Canyon this week. Michelle Meder, 53, from Ohio, died from a suspected heat-related illness on June 20.

The National Park Service has announced that a 60-year-old man died on June 22 while hiking at Grand Canyon.

William Smith, from Oswego, Illinois, “Was hiking out of the canyon after completing a day hike to Ooh Ahh Point, approximately one mile down the South Kaibab Trail.”

Bystanders then initiated CPR, and EMS personnel joined them and assisted with resuscitation efforts. The NPS added, “All attempts to resuscitate the victim were unsuccessful.”

There is now an investigation being conducted by the NPS and the Coconino County Medical Examiner.

On the page with details about the South Kaibab Trail, there is detailed information and warnings for those who decide to do the hike. Included, it says, “DO NOT attempt to hike from the rim to the river and back in one day, especially May to September.”

It also states, “Depending on how prepared you are, your trip can be a vacation or a challenge, a revelation or an ordeal. Over 250 people are rescued from the canyon each year. The difference between a great adventure in Grand Canyon and a trip to the hospital (or worse) is up to YOU.”

This is the second death in Grand Canyon this week. A woman named Michelle Meder, 53, from Ohio, died from a suspected heat-related illness on June 20. That day, temperatures hit 115 degrees and tied a previous record.

The Grand Canyon National Park spokeswoman Joelle Baird told the New York Post. that Tuesday when Smith died, it was 85 degrees.

“Our big message and push is to educate hikers about knowing their own physical abilities and not trying to do anything that they haven’t done before, especially when our search and rescue personnel are stretched thin,” she explained. “We want people to plan ahead and to be realistic about their limits.”

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