Man Alleges 6 LA Sheriff’s Deputies Viciously Beat Him During Traffic Stop: Lawsuit | Inside Edition

Man Alleges 6 LA Sheriff’s Deputies Viciously Beat Him During Traffic Stop: Lawsuit

Christopher Bailey suffered multiple broken bones in his face and had three surgeries to try to restore his vision in his left eye. Now he has filed a civil rights lawsuit, alleging excessive force. He wants the deputies to face criminal charges.

A California man is suing six Los Angeles sheriff’s deputies, alleging he was left with multiple broken bones and vision loss in one eye after being viciously beaten during a traffic stop last May. 

Christopher Bailey says he was on the way home from work, sorting mail for the U.S. Postal Service, around 2 a.m., when he was pulled over for straddling lanes. He says the deputies pummeled him mercilessly, landing at least 35 blows just to his face. 

Bailey says he did everything he was asked to do, but the police report states he resisted arrest. 

“I was screaming, ‘I want to live.’ They were trying to hurt me physically — choking me, kicking me, punching me,” Bailey said.

A bystander shot cell video of the aftermath. Christopher Bailey’s face was bloodied and swollen. At least one of the deputy’s uniforms was stained with blood.

Bailey says he followed all of the sheriff’s orders and “not one time” was he aggressive or belligerent during the stop.

“He complied with all directives as he stepped out of the vehicle. Then that’s when the beating began,” Bailey’s attorney Toni Jaramilla said. 

Bailey suffered multiple broken bones in his face and had three surgeries to try to restore his vision in his left eye. Now he has filed a civil rights lawsuit, alleging excessive force. He wants the deputies to face criminal charges.

“This incident was just a beatdown — a plain, gang-like beatdown of a black citizen,” Jaramilla said. 

Bailey was initially charged with three felony counts of resisting arrest, but those charges were dropped. The Los Angeles Sheriff's Department says they can't comment because of pending litigation. 

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