Director of National Intelligence Releases Statement on Lack of Data for 'Unidentified Aerial Phenomena' | Inside Edition

Director of National Intelligence Releases Statement on Lack of Data for 'Unidentified Aerial Phenomena'

The DNI released an official report in response to years of reports of “Unidentified Aerial Phenomena,” stating that the evidence is not conclusive enough for a solid analysis. 

The Director of National Intelligence released a report in response to “Unidentified Aerial Phenomena,” stating that the evidence is not conclusive enough for a solid analysis. 

Unidentified Aerial Phenomena (UAP) — defined as airborne objects not immediately identifiable — represents the broadest category of airborne objects reviewed for analysis.

According to this recently released report, the Unidentified Aerial Phenomena Task Force (UAPTF) has done its due diligence in investigating varied reports of UAP from 2004-2021. 

The report from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence stated, “The limited amount of high-quality reporting on unidentified aerial phenomena (UAP) hampers our ability to draw firm conclusions about the nature or intent of UAP.”

The Navy created a standardized reporting mechanism in 2019 that the Air Force adopted shortly after, but the report states that it is limited in the types of UAP it can detect.

“Consistent consolidation of reports from across the federal government, standardized reporting, increased collection and analysis, and a streamlined process for screening all such reports against a broad range of relevant USG data will allow for a more sophisticated analysis of UAP that is likely to deepen our understanding.” the report says.

The report states that a single explanation for the sighting is unlikely and offers the potential explanations: Airborne Clutter, Foreign Adversary Systems, “...technologies deployed by China, Russia, another nation, or a non-governmental entity,” Natural Atmospheric Phenomena, or USG or Industry Developmental Programs, but stated, “We were unable to confirm, however, that these systems accounted for any of the UAP reports we collected.”

The report states that though many reports have been made during this time period, there is a limited amount of information and evidence, so it is unable to make any solid conclusions.

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