Remains of Teens Who Died at Pearl Harbor During WWII Have Been Identified 70 Years Later | Inside Edition

Remains of Teens Who Died at Pearl Harbor During WWII Have Been Identified 70 Years Later

The teens lost their lives on December 7th, 1941, after the air attack on Pearl Harbor by Japanese forces. They are two of the 429 USS Oklahoma crew members who died that day. 

More remains of sailors who served in Pearl Harbor have been identified and will finally be laid to rest. The most recent are two teens, 19-year-old Charlton Ferguson from Mississippi and 19-year-old William Tucker from Bedford, Iowa.

Charlton Ferguson was a Naval musician, and according to the US Navy, their musicians performed for Americans at home and boosted the morale of sailors on deployment. William Tucker served as a Navy fireman. 

The two men lost their lives on December 7th, 1941, after the air attack on Pearl Harbor by Japanese forces. They were two of the 429 USS Oklahoma crew members who died that day. 

Lack of technology in the 1940s meant only 35 of the sailors' remains were identified and returned to their loved ones. The rest were buried in Hawaii at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl.

But now, DNA and anthropological analysis allow us to give names to the remains of two more young Pearl Harbor heroes. And both will be laid to rest in their hometowns.

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