Scotch Whisky Maker Glenfiddich Is Helping the Environment by Running Delivery Trucks on Whisky Byproduct | Inside Edition

Scotch Whisky Maker Glenfiddich Is Helping the Environment by Running Delivery Trucks on Whisky Byproduct

So far, three Glenfiddich trucks use this eco-friendly fuel, and the company says it’s working toward converting its entire fleet of about 20 trucks.

A strong dram of whisky has brought people together in bars and pubs for centuries. Now the liquor is bringing people together on environmental issues.

Legendary Scotch whisky maker Glenfiddich is legally mixing drinking and driving. They’re doing so by using waste products created during the distillation process to fuel their delivery trucks.

Martin Tangney, the founder of Celtic Renewables, told CBS News the whisky byproduct is called draff, and it can be used as an effective biofuel for vehicles.

“In the production of whisky less than 10% of what comes out of the distillery is actually the primary product," he said.

"Using the gas to power our trucks is a real first, and it is something that Glenfiddich has been able to bring together," added Stuart Watts, the Distilleries director for William Grant & Sons.

By using its whisky biofuel, Glenfiddich says it has cut carbon dioxide emissions by 95%. 

So far, three Glenfiddich trucks use this eco-friendly fuel, and the company says it’s working toward converting its entire fleet of about 20 trucks.

In 2017, coffee waste was mixed with biofuel to power some of Transport for London’s famous red buses. The coffee-derived biogas could be used in busses without mechanical modifications. 

The Scotch Whisky Association announced they want their industry to be carbon net-zero by the year 2040.

So drinkers can expect to see more Scotch with a green twist and enjoy it without the environmental burn.

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