Who Is Mellissa Carone? Trump's Star Witness in Michigan Compared to 'SNL' Character After Feisty Testimony

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The Trump campaign’s star witness at a Michigan house panel presenting more unfounded claims of voter fraud has turned into an overnight viral sensation. Mellissa Carone’s feisty testimony got lots of attention, with some comparing her to a character from a “Saturday Night Live” skit.

“These Democrats took every avenue possible to commit fraud in this election,” Carone said during the hearing.

Claims of widespread voter fraud and accusations that Democrats engaged in a coordinated scheme to steal the election have been repeatedly debunked.

“I know what I saw, and I signed something that says if I'm wrong, I go to prison,” Carone said.

Late night TV hosts are having a field day lampooning her, even suggesting that Carone was under the influence.

“What are the odds she's wearing a ‘Rosé All Day’ tank top under that scarf?” Jimmy Kimmel said.

Others are comparing her to Cecily Strong’s “Tipsy Party Girl” character on “SNL.” Even Rudy Giuliani, who was sitting next to her at the hearing, tried to shush her at one point.

Carone is fighting back today and denying she was drunk. “Absolutely not!” she tweeted.

The 33-year-old single mom is an aspiring actress and model, and a computer specialist who was hired to troubleshoot the ballot machines on election night.

Also raising eyebrows is the fact that Carone was charged in 2018 with obscenity for allegedly emailing sexually explicit video to her boyfriend's ex. She pleaded guilty to a lesser charge, which was dismissed after she served probation.

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