Wife Safely Lands Plane in Martha's Vineyard After Husband's Midair Medical Emergency

The impact caused the aircraft’s left wing to break in half, and both the pilot and passenger were transported to the local hospital. Soon after, a medical helicopter flew the pilot to a Boston hospital in serious life-threatening condition.

An investigation is underway after a plane being flown by a female passenger crash-landed in Martha's Vineyard.

The Massachusetts State Police conducted a preliminary investigation in the wake of the crash on Saturday, which indicated that the 79-year-male pilot suffered a medical emergency upon his final approach to the island.

That is when the female passenger took over the controls and attempted to land the aircraft, which resulted in a hard landing outside the runway according to MSP.

The impact caused the aircraft’s left wing to break in half, said MSP, and both the pilot and passenger were transported to the local hospital. Soon after, a medical helicopter flew the pilot to a Boston hospital in serious life-threatening condition.

The pilot is being identified as Randolph Bonnist, and the passenger his wife, Robin.

Earlier that day, the couple traveled to Westchester Airport in New York from their Connecticut home according to authorities.

Records obtained by Inside Edition Digital show that Randolph had an active pilot's license and just received a third class medical certificate last month. That certification is intended for pilots who fly recreationally and for those over 40 like Randolph, and it is valid for 24 months.

Robin is not a certified pilot but managed to make the landing without suffering any major injuries according to MSP.

One bystander actually filmed the landing, and he is now speaking to Inside Edition.

"It didn't look too banged up," he says of the aircraft. "It was pretty dramatic, kind of crazy. Everyone was rushing around."

Randolph remains hospitalized while the plane crash is under investigation by the State Police-Oak Bluffs Barracks, the State Police Detective Unit for the Cape and Islands District, and the Federal Aviation Administration.

 

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